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Is it okay to describe two actions, one in Present Perfect and one in the Past Simple, inside the same sentence and with the same time indicator?

For example:

During this summer she has become very sensitive and was often seen crying.

The time indicator here is: During this summer

The first action is: has become sensitive

The second action is: was seen crying

EDIT:

or should I stick to using Present Perfect for both actions?:

During this summer she has become very sensitive and has often been seen crying.

  • Yes, it is perfectly idiomatic since the perfect and the past tenses relate to different time conditions. During this summer indicates that the summer that just past, she has become very sensitive indicates during the course of the this summer she has become sensitive and consequently her sensitivity has resulted to her crying often. Here is a similar example Despite Eko has watched debating all his life, he did not go to today's debate. – 3kstc May 15 '17 at 5:30
  • @3kstc - I am a little bit confused her. Is "During this some" not the same time condition for both verbs in the sentence? And thought that "During this some" meant that the summer is still going on. Not? – brilliant May 15 '17 at 5:36
  • @3kstc - Isn't it that you have two time conditions in that sentence about Eko (one is "all his life", and the other one "today")? Also, the Past Tense there is used in negative ("did NOT go"), but I heard that negatives are used differently from positives even if it's the same verb and the same Tense. – brilliant May 15 '17 at 5:43
  • You're correct, it is the same summer period, the summer period that has just past or that you're currently in/going on, since has become is present perfect simple - which indicates that the consequences of past actions are important in the present. – 3kstc May 15 '17 at 5:46
  • @3kstc - How would the meaning change then if I used Perfect Tense for both actions? (Please, see the Edit in my question) – brilliant May 15 '17 at 5:49
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Yes, it is perfectly idiomatic since the perfect and the past tenses relate to different time conditions. The different time conditions is highlighted with a present simple perfect with has become.

Despite being the same summer period, it may be a different period within that summer period. For example it may be the start of the summer period where "she has become sensitive" and you might have noticed this change towards the end of "...this summer...", different periods under the same summer period.


Let's break down the sentence:

During this summer...

indicates the summer that has just past or that they are currently in,

...she has become very sensitive...

This indicates during the course of the summer she has become noticeably more sensitive, as has become is present perfect simple - which indicates that the consequences of past actions are important in the present.

...and was often seen crying.

and consequently her sensitivity has resulted to her crying often.

  • @brilliant If anything is unclear, let me know so I can rephrase my answer :D – 3kstc May 16 '17 at 4:05

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