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Which one of the following three sentences is correct:

"I have good knowledge and skill on the technologies you mentioned."
"I have good knowledge and skill at the technologies you mentioned."
"I have good knowledge and skill in the technologies you mentioned."
"I have good knowledge and skill with the technologies you mentioned."?

I checked some dictionaries, but I didn't find examples specific to the context I'm looking for.
And one more thing. Should I use 'skill' or 'skills' for that sentence?

Thanks.

closed as off-topic by Glorfindel, tchrist May 20 '17 at 22:50

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  • Hello, SR. ELU invites questions that are not easily answerable from common resources (online dictionaries usually give examples of sentences). If you don't find a suitable example in a couple of reputable dictionaries (say Macmillan and CED), tell us which don't include the usage, and your question will be more acceptable. – Edwin Ashworth May 13 '17 at 10:36
  • Cambridge Dictionary(dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/skill) – mahmud koya May 13 '17 at 11:54
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    @EdwinAshworth, I checked some dictionaries, but I didn't find examples specific to the context I'm looking for. That's why I posted the question. – Soulless Rony May 13 '17 at 13:00
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    I suggested two; mahmud koya even gives you a link to one that gives the usage. By default, assume that 'skill/s on' is unacceptable; 'skills in' would be unusual and 'skills at' again unacceptable. – Edwin Ashworth May 13 '17 at 13:10
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    I don’t think the selection of preposition depends on the word skill it depends on what follows. He demonstrated great skill at the piano vs He demonstrated great skill on the test today. He demonstrated great skill in Swimming today. He demonstrated great skill for one so young. He demonstrated great skill with children. He demonstrated great skill under the circumstances. – Jim May 13 '17 at 22:39
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As a native English speaker, it seemed obvious to me that “skills in” was the only one of the alternatives I would use from the list above. However an internet search was frustrating because I kept coming up with the likes of “technical skills”, presumably reflecting a more common sentence construction.

Rigging my searches, I managed eventually to come up with some related examples from books, all with ‘skill’ (singular).

…during the advance on Cambrai he showed ‘skill in attack’.

Because he showed skill in managing people…

He showed skill in easing the repression…

He showed skill in the decoration of pottery…

This, of course, does not prove that the others are incorrect. They just don’t sound right to me.

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