2

For the sentence: "I envy your seemingly convenient reason for X."

The "I envy" is genuine. The guy I was talking to makes trips. Let's say we both ride motorcycles, and I envied his seemingly convenient reason to travel to some place. I'd like one, but I need to work at finding places to ride my bike to. I didn't know whether he went to that place out of obligation or because he liked it. If the former, seems like it'd be in bad taste.

  • snarky ? (I don't quite understand why 'convenient reason' alone doesn't imply some deceit...especially leading in with the snarky "I envy your") – Tom22 May 13 '17 at 1:09
  • The "I envy" is genuine. The guy I was talking to makes trips. Let's say we both ride motorcycles, and I envied his seemingly convenient reason to travel to some place. I'd like one, but I need to work at finding places to ride my bike to. I didn't know whether he went to that place out of obligation or because he liked it. If the former, seems like it'd be in bad taste. – Marko Galesic May 13 '17 at 1:14
  • 1
    excuse me! :) The motorcycle trip example helps. – Tom22 May 13 '17 at 1:18
  • ... Your ability to rationalize owning a motorcycle. – Jim May 13 '17 at 1:35
  • 1
    You should incorporate your comment into your question – ab2 ReinstateMonicaNow May 13 '17 at 1:37
1

Possibly you mean knack, as defined by The Free Dictionary:

  1. a skilful, ingenious, or resourceful way of doing something

  2. a particular talent or aptitude, esp an intuitive one

Examples (semi-made up):

I envy your knack for finding interesting places to travel to by motorcycle.

I envy your knack for arranging your life so that you can motorcycle to Yosemite Valley at least once a month.

0

If you suspect he didn't really need to take the ride, then I think pretext could work. From MW:

A purpose or motive alleged or an appearance assumed in order to cloak the real intention or state of affairs

  • In formal or more serious conversation, maybe, but this was casual texting. – Marko Galesic May 13 '17 at 1:49
0

'Excuse' or 'Good Excuse'

I envy your good excuse for going on a motorbike trip.

A rather political example of this idiom from Chicago Tribune:

Trump needed a really good excuse to fire Comey; Comey gave it to him

The implication in the article is that the firing of the FBI director was both legitimate and convenient for the President.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.