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I have an american friend who tells me that this sentence:

[...] Since their absence results in a relevant market which is defined too broad, the two-sided critical loss analysis cannot be recommended ultimately for actual merger cases.

sounds more natural than this one:

[...] Since their absence results in a relevant market which is defined too broad, the two-sided critical loss analysis ultimately cannot be recommended for actual merger cases.

I'm no native English speaker, but the first one sounds weird to me. I would be very glad if I could have some more opinions on this - thanks!

Edit: I'm aware that there are (a lot) of other questions concerning the positioning of adverbs. However, since this is the last sentence in my abstract, I want the sentence to be perfect and not choose the "ultimately" at a random position. Maybe someone could explain which position would make the most sense / sounds the most natural.

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, Edwin Ashworth, Glorfindel, user66974, Cascabel May 8 '17 at 21:28

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You have it right, the second example is far more natural sounding. However, purely as a stylistic preference, I would recommend switching "ultimately" and "cannot". Finally, instead of saying "defined too broad", I would say "too broadly defined".

The most natural sentence would read like this:

Since their absence results in a relevant market which is too broadly defined, the two-sided critical loss analysis cannot ultimately be recommended for actual merger cases.

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