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I am drafting an email in which I would like to convey that

Dian Guang Zhou is there most of the time

but would like a more effecient way of conveying this idea.

I want the sentence to read like so: [Subject] [verb] [place pronoun].

I thought about frequent, but it makes the subject sound like a patron instead of an owner (and he is an owner). I wish I could say "he oftens there."

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    Your sentence is pretty efficient. Depending on exactly what is supposed to be meant by "is there most of the time," you might use Dian Guang Zhou hangs out there. – Peter Shor May 2 '17 at 14:06
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    'is usually there'? – Spagirl May 2 '17 at 14:13
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    Your sentence is already efficient. If you want to imply that people can come to Dian for assistance and he's there to help, then I would write "Dian is available to assist customers most of the time during business hours." Instead of "available" you can also use "on hand". For ultimate efficiency, "Dian is usually on hand". – Martin Krzywinski May 2 '17 at 23:28
  • @MartinKrzywinski Yes. And to really drive home the distinguishing effect I could have said "Dian is the owner usually on hand." Very good! – Jonathan Muse May 3 '17 at 21:19
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The verb frequent can work here as a single word:

Dian Guang Zhou frequents the art gallery.

Defined as

to visit often; go often to; be often in: to frequent the art galleries. (Dictionary.com #4)

Another verb that might be a little more edgy is haunt.

Dian Guang Zhou haunts the art gallery.

Defined as

to visit frequently; go to often: He haunted the galleries and bars that the artists went to. (Dictionary.com #3)

With your updated clarification, you can say He's often there of, as spagirl said, He's usually there. But this doesn't give you the verb you requested. (You can also say He often is there, but this doesn't contract nicely to He often's there, which, apart from the apostrophe, is like your preference in your question.)

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    I like frequents - I didn’t think of that. Or maybe even works there - which is probably closer to what OP is after. – Jim May 2 '17 at 14:22
  • I thought about frequent, but it makes the subject sound like a patron instead of an owner (and he is an owner). I wish I could say "he oftens there." I might end up going with the colloquial: "he stay dyeuh" – Jonathan Muse May 2 '17 at 15:23
  • @JonathanMuse - Can you add that information to the question? That is an important fact that most people will miss if it's only in the comments. – Canis Lupus May 2 '17 at 16:02
  • @CanisLupus So edited. – Jonathan Muse May 2 '17 at 20:34
  • @JonathanMuse Dyeuh is colloquial? In which language exactly? It's certainly not an English word I've ever come across… – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 2 '17 at 21:57

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