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In English usage, should one use high-school, high school, or highschool? (Assume American English; I understand that the Brits call it secondary school.)

closed as off-topic by Mari-Lou A, Cascabel, Hot Licks, Edwin Ashworth, Mitch Apr 27 '17 at 13:45

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    How do dictionaries list it? – Davo Apr 25 '17 at 20:54
  • @davo All of them. Does that mean they're interchangeable, or is there a specific usage for each? – DonielF Apr 25 '17 at 20:55
  • It depends on how the words are being used. – Hot Licks Apr 25 '17 at 22:23
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    This is actually a fairly challenging question, as it raises questions not merely about the tendency in English to close up hyphenated compounds, but also about the countervailing phenomenon in English of opening certain very familiar compound forms (such as "real estate" in the phrase "real estate agent"). I would reopen this question. – Sven Yargs Feb 12 at 5:12
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According to dictionary.com, the correct term is high school. All other variants redirect to that. As a native English speaker, I've seen highschool most.

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