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I'm looking for an expression that is used when you have a lot to tell about a specific matter but you will say only a short summary, usually due to courteousness towards the conversation partner, e.g. I am writing someone an email stating something. I have sent him multiple emails before regarding the same subject. So the email will go something like this:

I will not repeat here the points I stated in my previous emails. I will _______ with saying ...

I also believe the general form for the expression is "I will _______ with saying ...", where ______ means something like being content with.

  • 2
    summarize by saying works. So does content myself with saying, if you must have "with." Or you can say "To summarize" or "In summary" – Xanne Apr 22 '17 at 6:03
  • content myself with saying sounds pretty good. It might just be what I had on my mind, but I'm not sure yet. I don't necessarily have to have "with", anything along that line works, e.g: to say, by saying, ... – user2268997 Apr 22 '17 at 6:21
  • "cut to the chase", or "get on with it"... – Cascabel Apr 22 '17 at 10:23
  • @Xanne, post that as an answer. I remembered; it was actually what I had in mind (its outlines at least). – user2268997 Apr 22 '17 at 13:28
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    Using @Xanne 's “content myself with” would indeed seem to be the best way to go, but there seems to be a missing “therefore” (or maybe something, like an "Although + nevertheless") to connect the ideas contained in your two sentences. ……. “[Although] Without/Not wanting to [fatigue/trouble you by] repeat[ing] here all of the points discussed in my previous emails, I will [nevertheless] therefore content myself with summarizing them as follows: .... – Papa Poule Apr 22 '17 at 15:43
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You can write "I will summarize by saying" or "I will content myself with saying"

Alternatively, you can say "To summarize" or "In summary", preceding any of these with "Therefore" if you wish.

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In your example, the word suffice seems appropriate.

to be enough or adequate for; satisfy.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/suffice?s=t

So you could say:

I will suffice with saying ...

  • I'm not relly sure whether "I will suffice" has the correct meaning. This technically means "I am enough" but what I want to say is "what I'm about to say is enough". There is actually the common expression suffice it to say that... which works here, but I'm looking for something with the form I stated in my question. – user2268997 Apr 22 '17 at 5:50
  • @user2268997 you make a valid point about "I will suffice." You could alternatively say "It will suffice to say" which is a little less idiomatic than suffice it to say. – RaceYouAnytime Apr 22 '17 at 16:23
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"I will not repeat here the points I stated in my previous emails. I will confine myself to..."

Keep or restrict someone or something within certain limits of (space, scope, or time)

Reference:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/confine

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How about:

For the sake of brevity, I will not repeat here the points I stated in my previous emails.

  • I'm actually looking for the part that comes after this, i.e: "but I will say this ..." – user2268997 Apr 22 '17 at 7:16
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I will spare you the details... (or spare you with the details)

The idiom here is spare me, and it is covered in this ELU question (I thought “spare me with …” means “don't bother me with the details of …”. Does it?)

So your statement might be

I will not repeat here the points I stated in my previous emails. I will spare you the details by saying ...

From Macmillan Dictionary

to not tell someone every detail about something because it is too boring, personal, or unpleasant

Another common expression is save (us) some time by. It's literal meaning is clear, but its subtext is that there is much that will be omitted. It might be understood that the missing information has already been covered or, for some other reason, it is not completely necessary to make a point.

Your statement would become something like this:

I will not repeat here the points I stated in my previous emails. I will save some time by saying ...

or

To save (some) time, I will not repeat here the points I stated in my previous emails...

Similar alternatives, that have a polite tone, include in the interest of saving (us both some) time or the idiom for the sake of brevity.

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  1. I'll briefly mention
  2. To recap,… ,
  3. I will just mention in passing
  4. I will limit myself by saying

Sources: Oxford Dictionaries, Collins Dictionary, and Google.

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