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I'm wondering what contribution the word "through" makes to the following sentence:

The trend continued [through] to April.

How does the above differ from the following?

The trend continued to April.

The trend continued until April.

I'd appreciate your help.

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    The term through is very commonly used in AusEng. Through is often used to denote inclusion, thereby "The trend continued [through] to April.` would mean that the "trend continued into April. "
    – 3kstc
    Jun 20, 2017 at 0:53
  • It establishes the recurring nature of something. I'm not a fan of your sample sentence. "Continued through to" does not normally appear with continuous entities such as trends, but rather with discrete entities such as payments. It works well with fuzzy concepts like "effects" or "manifestations" which might be either. "For Soviet Gulag survivors, the negative consequences of repression continued through to the end of the victim's lifetime and beyond, in ever widening circles." - On Living Through Soviet Russia - Page 214.
    – Phil Sweet
    Jul 20, 2017 at 0:23
  • I think the origin is that it carried through something to April. Most likely something including part of March. Correct? I don't know, but that is likely where it comes from. Doesn't seem any more of a sin than "turn off onto a side road," where it's a given that the object of "off" is "that road". Apr 16, 2018 at 8:03
  • 'The trend continued through to April' sounds idiomatic and with quite a US flavor to my ears, 'The trend continued to April' sounds unidiomatic, while 'The trend continued up until April' sounds idiomatic and with quite a British flavour. Nov 27, 2021 at 12:13

1 Answer 1

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I think what you'd actually want to say is, "The trend continued through April." This implies that the trend continued until the end of April. Conversely, "The trend continued until April," implies that the trend continued until the start of April.

I would not say, "The trend continued to April," or, "The trend continued through to April," as both are a little awkward/ambiguous.

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  • can you say "continue well into April." meaning the trend is still going on in April and when it stops is unknown?
    – Apollyon
    Apr 19, 2017 at 13:49
  • "The tend will continue well into April," is a prediction that the trend will continue until some unspecified point in April that is not "the beginning" of April. "The trend will continue into April," is a prediction that the trend will continue until some unspecified point in April; could be the beginning, could be the end, could be the middle.
    – Azuaron
    Apr 19, 2017 at 13:52
  • But you can also use it in the past tense: "The trend continued well into April." which means it ended sometime after the beginning of April.
    – Barmar
    Apr 20, 2017 at 21:01

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