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"Civil rights icon Rosa Parks will forever be remembered for adamantly refusing to give up her seat on a public bus--even after the bus driver insisted, she remained rooted in place."

In the above sentence, what is the part of speech of "adamantly"?

Since adamantly is describing the verb refusing, shouldn't it be an adverb?

Please look in the reference link below :- https://gre.magoosh.com/flashcards/vocabulary/common-words-4/adamant

Please provide references for your answer, if possible.

P.S. My writing skills need work. If you notice any punctuation or grammar problems in my question, please say so!

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    It is an adverb. Adverbs are frequently derived from adjectives by adding the suffix -ly. – StoneyB on hiatus Apr 17 '17 at 17:13
  • You can find this information in a dictionary. My favorite online dictionary resource is OneLook Dictionary Search. Here is a link from that: Merriam-Webster entry for adamant : "adamantly adverb" – herisson Apr 17 '17 at 17:14
  • @sumelic Thank you for your response. I am curious why you have put this question as off-topic. I am new to this site, so would appreciate any input.. – redd Apr 19 '17 at 10:50
  • @Edwin Ashworth I am curious why you have put this question as off-topic. I am new to this site, so would appreciate any input. p.s. Can't tag multiple people to a comment, please excuse the duplicate comment. – redd Apr 19 '17 at 10:52
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You're right -- "adamantly" is an adverb modifying the verb "refusing". There is sometimes confusion in explaining this sort of construction when people argue that "refusing" must be a noun because it is the object of the preposition "for", and so it ought to be modified by an adjective, here "adamant", rather than an adverb. For instance, one could have used the noun "refusal" in your example: "... be remembered for her adamant refusal to give up her seat ...", and then the adverb "adamantly" must change to an adjective, because an adverb can't modify a noun.

Nonetheless, "refusing" here is still a verb, sometimes called a gerund, even though "refusing" is head of a noun phrase which is the object of a preposition.

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