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I'm finishing abstract for my Bachelors thesis. I would like to get rid of not yet known repetition in following consequent sentences:

Efficiency of these extracts in protection of medical plants is not yet known. Impact of these extracts on quality of the product is not yet known. Impact of these extracts on the environment is not yet known.

I can't figure out, how to put these three subjects into single sentence.

Which of following compound sentences are grammatically correct and represent the same meaning?

Neither efficiency of these extracts in protection of medical plants, nor impact on quality of the product, nor impact on the environment, is known.

Or:

Neither efficiency of these extracts in protection of medical plants, nor impact on quality of the product, nor impact on the environment, is not yet known.

Or:

Efficiency of these extracts in protection of medical plants, and impact on quality of the product, and impact on the environment, is not yet known.

Thank you

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  • You could make it positive instead, starting with something like "Still to be explored are efficiency of these extracts..." or "Remaining questions include" etc. Suggestions for future research are a common feature of scholarly articles, usually in the conclusion. (But often the abstract just says something like "and directions for future research are discussed" without going into detail about what those directions are.) – 1006a Apr 14 '17 at 16:04
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With regard to these extracts, the following are not yet known: their efficiency in protection of medical plants, their impacts on the environment and on the quality of the product.

Or,

Regarding these extracts, their efficiency in protecting medical plants and their impacts on the environment and on the quality of the product are not yet known.

Or,

The efficiency of these extracts in protection of medical plants and their impacts on the quality of the product and on the environment are not yet known.

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Maybe if you set it up as more of a basic list of not known things than try to negate the knowing with neither and nor. I also think it improves readability in a fairly long sentence like this to know up front what the list is about.

Some things are not yet known: efficiency of these extracts in protection of medical plants, impact of these extracts on quality of the product, and impact of these extracts on the environment.

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  • Well, these three subjects are practically almost all main characteristics of extracts (studied topics - impacts and efficiency). So, using some things lightens weight of the sentence. Meaning of these three sentences is more like nothing was tested, but using nothing would be way too broad. So, I would rather not put it in there as a list of things. Is a different way, which doesn't use a basic list? – Lenka Apr 14 '17 at 14:46

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