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"It was not only nice to see but also well to taste."

I think I have to change 'well to taste' into a correct form but I don't know how. Please let me know what to use instead of 'well' and why.

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2 Answers 2

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"Well" is used to describe a verb and it is an adverb. For example,

It was a job well done. (Done is the verb here.)

How was the job done? Well

On the other hand, good is an adjective and describes nouns. For example,

The work that you are doing is really good. (Work is used as a noun here.)

You can check out this link to understand the difference between well and good.

For your sentence, you can write,

It was not only nice to see but also good to taste.

While taste is a verb, to taste is an infinitive form of the verb and we do use adjectives to describe the infinitive form of verbs. For example, "good to taste", "hot to touch", "quick to react" and so on. [It would be great it somebody could shed more light on the usage of adjectives with infinitive form of verbs].

You can also replace "good to taste" with "delicious" like

It was not only nice to see but also delicious.

or any of its synonyms.

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"It was not only nice to see but also well to taste". Are we talking about food? Not only I would indeed replace "well" with 'good' or 'excellent' as it would help your sentence which I think could meaningfully use stronger gastronomic references, (unless we are talking about a well done steak! Although I am not even entirely sure food is the topic at all given the information provided ) but I would also strongly suggest to review how you are using the verb 'to see' inadequately, I fear, in your sentence. While we can see the food we eat, we don't need to see it to appreciate its taste. In fact, it is even tastier when we close our eyes. Nevertheless, we would need to look at it before we could determine how nice it was (or looked). I therefore suggest your sentence requires the following corrections: "Not only it was nice to look at, but also exquisite to taste."

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