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What is the reason for using "to" and "to the" before the word "church" in different parts of this passage?

On Sundays, we always went to church. After breakfast, the carriage took Ambrose and me to the church in the village. All the servants came to church too. On Sunday evenings, we had an early dinner. Usually, some of our neighbours would eat with us.

(My Cousin Rachel, Daphne Du Maurie)

marked as duplicate by Cascabel, sumelic, CDM, tchrist Apr 12 '17 at 21:54

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By saying to church one means church the institution. By saying to the church one means church the building.

On Sundays, we always went to church.

Here, it doesn't matter which church we went to, geographically. What is important is that we attended the Christian House of God.

After breakfast, the carriage took Ambrose and me to the church in the village

Here, a specific building rather than the institution in general is meant, hence the definite article.

It is the same difference as between to school and to the school.

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