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I want a compensation equal to the value of my time.

I was told by a native speaker that this is the correct expression (instead of saying equal to my time value), but I don't know why.

Could someone explain and give other examples?

  • In what context? Time value is a perfectly valid expression. – lly Apr 11 '17 at 20:39
  • "I want a compensation equal to the value of my time." I was told by a native speaker that this is the correct one (instead of saying ...equal to my time value) – Beto Apr 11 '17 at 20:42
  • @lly, "time value" may be grammatically correct, but it is normally associated with a different meaning. "Value of my time" refers to the the value of the time, itself. "Time value" is normally associated with the value of something that is affected by time. For example, if you have money earning interest, it will be worth more at a later time. That's referred to as the "time value" of money; the money increases in value with time. – fixer1234 Apr 12 '17 at 4:29
  • @fixer1234 Exactly. Hence the request for context. edit: Oh, it's been edited and is clearer now. Peachy. – lly Apr 12 '17 at 6:37
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"Time value" is a term often used in a technical sense in economics and finance to mean the discounting of the value of a future event with a certain value based upon an appropriate interest rate to determine its present value, usually as part of the phrase the "time value of money".

So, if you try to use the term "time value" in a context when you mean to say "the value of my time", you are likely to cause confusion. This is because someone may think that you are trying to adjust the values of your economic contribution based upon an interest rate to reflect the particular time at which your services are performed, rather than the more basic concept that you time has value and should be compensated.

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