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"She visits weekly to verify addresses, and check residents have registered all their details in accordance with the law".

What does it really want to illustrate? Does it mean that she checks to confirm whether all of the residents have registered all their details in accordance with the law? Or is it just an assertive sentence? I'm so confused by this kind of structure, because I'm a Chinese speaker.

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    Visit is a typo for visits. Verify addresses and check residents &c is a conjoining of two infinitival VPs, both signaled by the preceding subordinator to--the same construction as "She visits weekly to gossip and snoop". Apr 10, 2017 at 3:43
  • I still don't get it. I'm talking about this part- "check residents have registered all their details in accordance with the law" is she confirming? if yes, then why don't they put "whether" into this sentence to make it sound like she's confirming.
    – Jia Yu
    Apr 10, 2017 at 3:57
  • Not check/confirm whether but check/confirm that--subordinator that is almost always omissible. Apr 10, 2017 at 4:05
  • @StoneyB I agree you can't leave out "whether"; I just thought it would help the OP understand the sentence.
    – Xanne
    Apr 10, 2017 at 4:09
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    "She visits weekly to [verify addresses], and [check (that) residents have registered all their details in accordance with the law]". The two expressions in square brackets are purpose adjuncts introduced by the subordinator “to”. They give the purpose of her weekly visits. Note that you could also have “She visits weekly in order to … ”
    – BillJ
    Apr 10, 2017 at 7:36

1 Answer 1

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Adding what's left out (implicit in the sentence, as StoneyB explains in his comment):

She visits weekly to verify addresses and [to] check [that] residents have registered all their details in accordance with the law.

Yes, you could use whether instead of that. Leaving out "that" makes it a little hard to get the meaning on first reading.

Also note it really shouldn't have a comma.

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  • so the word "that" is kinda acting like the word "if" in this sentence. anyway, this sentence is all about confirming right?
    – Jia Yu
    Apr 10, 2017 at 4:53
  • It's about what you mean by "confirming."
    – Xanne
    Apr 10, 2017 at 5:14
  • I get it, so the omissible suborinator is actually the word "that". I really appreciated your helps, but I still don't know how to use this type of sentence structure properly. Anyway, I wanna reward u guys with some coins in return. Do they have coins here or other things for rewarding?
    – Jia Yu
    Apr 10, 2017 at 5:48

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