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I am currently trying to do my English homework and am stuck on the use of a word before "which". My current sentence is below and what I would like to aim is below that.

Current one:

We eat goose every year at Christmas, except for this year. This year, we ate turkey.

I would like to turn it all into one sentence and am trying to find the correct conjunction and believe it is a word followed by which

Example of the final sentence without the "magic" word:

We eat goose every year at Christmas, except this year [word goes here] which we ate turkey.

I believe that "which" is the right "helper" word for this but feel free to correct me if you believe something else should be used.

Can anyone help with this? It's got me stumped.

  • "at which" would work, because "which" represents "Christmas", and as you clearly know, when referring to Christmas as a time, we use "at Christmas". (Comment only as I have no references or knowledge of proper terms to make this into a real answer.) – AndyT Apr 7 '17 at 16:28
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It's simpler if you use when:

We eat goose every year at Christmas, except this year when we ate turkey.

because that's the wh-word related to time.

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