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Which is more correct?

Tomorrow, April 7, at 10:00 a.m.

or:

Tomorrow, April 7 at 10:00 a.m.

EDIT: This question was prompted by someone telling me that it's incorrect to separate date and time with a comma; therefore I'm not asking about "helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse"-type cases in general, but whether there are any other, specifically date-and-time-related, factors at play here, as that person seemed to suggest. From what I gather, the answer is no. Perhaps I should've made that clearer right away, but I think this question is not a duplicate at least insofar as I was intending it to be more specific than the question it's been marked as a dupicate of.

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  • I would use both commas, because tomorrow refers only to the date, not the time. Without the second comma, it looks like tomorrow is referring to both the date and the time.
    – Tom Zych
    Apr 6, 2017 at 20:36
  • Possible duplicate of Correct punctuation with two nouns? Apr 6, 2017 at 22:05
  • @EdwinAshworth What I'm essentially asking is whether this follows that default punctuation pattern, or there are overriding conventions related specifically to date and time. Which is why I don't think it's a duplicate.
    – freedomcry
    Apr 6, 2017 at 23:06
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    @freedomcry For more information about dates and times specifically, take a look at this article: dailywritingtips.com/… It addresses this exact case with an example. '...the combination of day, date, and time requires organizational punctuation: “The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 31, at 7 p.m.”' Apr 6, 2017 at 23:23
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    For what it's worth, I added my link to the answer, so that it applies to both comma use rules in general and cases specific to date and time. Apr 8, 2017 at 20:19

1 Answer 1

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Use both commas. These are parenthetical commas, adding supplemental information about "tomorrow." Per The Elements of Style by Strunk and White, parenthetical commas can sometimes be omitted, but if they're used before a parenthetical phrase, they must be used after it as well.

http://www.bartleby.com/141/strunk.html

On parenthetical comma use:

...whether the interruption be slight or considerable... never omit one comma and leave the other.

Since this question is specific to dates and times, it's worth taking a look at this article:

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/how-to-punctuate-references-to-dates-and-times/

It addresses this case with an example:

...the combination of day, date, and time requires organizational punctuation: “The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 31, at 7 p.m.”

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