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How do I punctuate this sentence? When I say it, I raise my voice on the word available, which leads me to think there should be a question mark there. But I also learned in grade school to never start a sentence with Or (I know there can be exceptions; I'm just not a strong enough linguist to know what they are). The second part of the two part question looks like a question, but isn't said like a question, which throws me a little bit. I don't want the reader raising his voice on the word guarantee.

Is the second option still available? Or do you not honor your guarantee?

Is the second option still available? Or do you not honor your guarantee.

Is the second option still available, or do you not honor your guarantee?

Is the second option still available, or do you not honor your guarantee.

  • Versions 2 and 4 are best. The second part is a rhetorical question, but still a question. Is it not? You have found that special case where 'Or' starts a sentence just right by adding the drama you seek. – Yosef Baskin Apr 4 '17 at 21:07
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I think the third option is grammatically correct, for formal written English, but the first might work for reported speech.

If you were saying that in a shop, there might be a significant pause before "Or," which warrants it going into a separate sentence in my opinion. Spoken English is not necessarily perfectly correct English!

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