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For example, I wrote this:

However, offering anything more specific than first, second, and third class will slow processing times, increase customer inconvenience and customer inequality, all of which will dampen the customer service experience JetBlue values so highly.

...but can I split it into two sentences like this?

However, offering anything more specific than first, second, and third class will slow processing times, increase customer inconvenience and customer inequality. All of which will dampen the customer service experience JetBlue values so highly.

Why or why not?

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    Yes, you can; it's fine. It is a supplementary (non-defining) relative clause. "Which" is anaphoric to the entire preceding clause. It has a finite verb phrase "will dampen the customer service experience JetBlue values so highly" ("will" is a tensed verb).
    – BillJ
    Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 8:27

1 Answer 1

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No, this does not work. "All of which will dampen the customer service experience JetBlue values so highly" is a relative clause, and as such, it is dependent. Only an independent clause can be used in a sentence on its own.

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  • But sentence fragments are not unacceptable per se (though they are probably better avoided in more formal registers). Commented Mar 31, 2017 at 21:37
  • Ok, so "all of which" means the same thing as "which" which is a relative pronoun which is why this is a relative clause and, therefore, dependent? However, according to this website:writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/relative-clauses relative pronouns can also lead to independent clauses. For example, they say that "The person" is a relative pronoun.
    – Jiga
    Commented Mar 31, 2017 at 23:14
  • @Jiga No, you're misreading that article (though it is poorly expressed). Note that the article has already stated: '... a “relative pronoun,” which substitutes [bolding mine] for a noun, a noun phrase, or a pronoun when sentences are combined'. They mean << 'who' is the relative pronoun substituting for the subject 'the person' of the second sentence in the uncombined version. >> I'm sure you agree that 'the dog' (also in red) can't possibly be a relative pronoun. Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 0:08
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    Supplementary (non-defining) relative clauses can constitute a separate sentence, provided they contain a finite VP, compare A: "Our rent is due next week". B: "Which is why we shouldn't be going out to dinner tonight".
    – BillJ
    Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 8:19
  • Disagree. Strip 'Of which' and you are left with all. This is not an incomplete sentence. Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 11:21

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