0

I'm interested in understanding the following paragraph:

I’m stereotyping when I say that the Chinese can’t drive for shit. They just can’t, and that’s that.

The word stereotype is a new one to me and I looked it up in the dictionary. I've read all the explanations but still not sure I've understood it. Does it mean that guy is unjustified when saying Chinese can't drive? Or does it mean the guy just literally says Chinese can't drive?

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, tchrist Mar 29 '17 at 18:13

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    You've missed an important piece of context. That clause starts ain’t nobody telling me I’m stereotyping when I say... In this context, ain't nobody telling me = it isn't true that. Does it make more sense now? – 1006a Mar 29 '17 at 16:48
2

Another way of phrasing this is:

I am using a stereotype when I say the Chinese can't drive for shit.

A stereotype is:

A set idea that people have about what someone or something is like, especially an idea that is wrong (Cambridge Dictionary)

They have changed the noun stereotype into a verb form. This is called gerunding (See what I did there?)

As 1006a points out, the entire phrase is:

Ain’t nobody telling me I’m stereotyping when I say that the Chinese can’t drive for shit. They just can’t, and that’s that.


This is saying that people may say they are being stereotypical in saying the Chinese can’t drive for shit, (as it is arguable that while some may not be able to, some are likely to be proficient drivers) but they are arguing that they are not being stereotypical, and asserting it is a fact.

This is ironic since despite by denying being stereotypical, they are admitting to their stereotype.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.