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This is a sentence from a piece of news from The New York Times:

Top House Democrats on Monday called on the Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee to recuse himself from the panel’s investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, thrusting the entire inquiry into jeopardy amid what they described as mounting evidence he was too close to President Trump to be impartial.

I don't understand the part

thrusting the entire inquiry into jeopardy amid what they described as mounting evidence he was too close to President Trump to be impartial.

What kind of clause is "he was too close to President Trump to be impartial" and how is it linked to the whole sentence?

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    It is a a noun complement clause attached to the noun evidence. The complementizer that has been omitted. See English Grammar: Complement Clause. See also UEfAP – AmE speaker Mar 28 '17 at 14:17
  • See also the chapter in English Grammar: A University Course – AmE speaker Mar 28 '17 at 14:25
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    "Top House Democrats on Monday called on the Republican chairman...to recuse himself from the panel's investigation....mounting evidence THAT he was too close to President Trump to be impartial ( =the Republican chairman was so close to President Trump that he would not be impartial.) -a complement (adjectival) clause describing the noun 'evidence'. – mahmud koya Mar 28 '17 at 14:39
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    Serious grammar does not talk of "noun clauses": it's a misnomer. The expression "(that) he was too close to President Trump to be impartial" is a declarative content clause functioning as Complement to the noun "evidence". Are you also asking about the entire clause beginning "thrusting .."? – BillJ Mar 28 '17 at 18:12
  • @BillJ: thanks for your comment. The expression "(that) he was too close to President Trump to be impartial" was what confused me. Nonetheless, what kind of clause would you say about the entire clause beginning "thrusting..."? – Jack Mar 28 '17 at 21:22

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