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In the 21st century, generally would we still say we have both supper and dinner along with lunch on the same day?

I live in Seychelles and the eating habit here is breakfast-lunch-heavy dinner. Even when you offer a light supper, they say they'll wait for the dinner.

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    lunch-vs-dinner-vs-supper-times-and-meanings english.stackexchange.com/questions/22446/… – mahmud k pukayoor Mar 28 '17 at 7:45
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    Is this a question about eating habits? People do not generally say "I murdered my wife", but it is perfectly good English.. – davidlol Mar 28 '17 at 7:48
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    In the UK, it's very much a cultural thing whether you say "lunch and dinner" or "dinner and tea". "Supper" isn't a widely used term. – Kate Bunting Mar 28 '17 at 7:57
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    In the US, the choice of terminology for meals is highly dependent on local culture, social status, and family history. You can't really generalize. – Hot Licks Mar 28 '17 at 12:02
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    @HotLicks Really? I have never encountered anything except "breakfast [morning], lunch [noon/afternoon], dinner [evening]" here, with "supper" an infrequent synonym for "dinner" without a change in meaning or time. I don't know anyone who "takes tea" meaning to eat rather than drink tea, and I've never heard of an established late-night/bedtime meal, as spagirl describes her supper. What she describes would be a called "bedtime snack" but I don't know anyone who takes it regularly and with family. What other widespread practices in the US are you aware of? – Dan Bron Mar 28 '17 at 12:08

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