1

Is it ok to say is not advised meaning it is not recommended to?

Something like:

It is not advised to lay cables in channels

I know that be advised means be prepared/informed, but I'm not sure it can mean "not recommended".

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  • 4
    Just to clear up something that no answer has said so far, 'advised' does not mean 'prepared'. Mar 24, 2017 at 14:05
  • "Is it ok to say is not advised?" No - as Lambie's answer notes, that wouldn't be advisable.
    – Lawrence
    Mar 24, 2017 at 14:34

5 Answers 5

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It is not advised to lay cables in channels I know that be advised means be prepared/informed, but I'm not sure it can mean "not recommended".

  • /It is recommended/ that cables not be laid in the channel.
  • /The company recommends/ not laying cables in the channel.

  • Be advised [take note of the fact that] cables will not be laid in channels.

    Versus

  • It is not advisable [not a good idea] to lay cables in channels.

Summary: /It is not advisable/ can mean /It is not recommended/. However, /be advised/ cannot mean /it is not recommended/

3

Not advised can mean the same thing as not recommended, as it is used in the sentence, "It is not recommended that you touch that food". If you put "It is not advised that you touch that food", it means the same thing! But for better word play, try it is "not a good idea"

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  • I agree with your answer -- but I was wondering, what do you mean by "better word play"? // Your answer would be strengthened with a quote from some authoritative source. For example, Oxford has a couple of helpful example sentences you could quote and link to (en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/advise). Mar 26, 2017 at 18:26
  • "not a good idea" is not as official as not recommended/advised. But if official context is not implied "not a good idea" suits well. Mar 27, 2017 at 6:25
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Advise can also mean recommend:

1.1 [with object] Recommend.

‘sleeping pills are not advised’

So, not advised can also mean not recommended.

0

Both terms are valid, but what differentiate them is the "direct and indirect object". (See the link for a further explanation)

For instance: As a transitive verb 1 a: to give (someone) a recommendation about what should be done: to give advice to. Her doctor advised her to try a drier climate. b: caution, warn, advise them of the consequences. c: recommend, advise prudence. 2: to give information or notice to: inform, advise them of their rights.

As an intransitive verb 1): to give a recommendation about what should be done: "advise on legal matters" 2): to talk with someone in order to decide what should be done: consult, advise with friends

And just in case, take a look at what transitive and intransitive verbs are. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/transitive-and-intransitive-verbs

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The difference between "is not advised" and "is not recommended" is one of tone. The first phrase is a bit "wishy-washy", implying simply that your action will not be "blessed" should you do "that". The second phrase is a bit sterner and implies that you will be effectively breaking the rules (or at least going against recommendations) if you do it.

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