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What would be the best way to replace “afraid of dead people” with a single word in this sentence:

A girl afraid of the dead protects nonviolent monsters ripped off their humanity from the atrocious humans, which are prepared to do anything not to become monsters they once were.

This is a logline for a script so it must be so simple that a child understands it without looking up in books or similar. I will probably cut out “ripped off their humanity” in the end version.

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    Could you include the words you found in your question? – oerkelens Mar 24 '17 at 8:44
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    Can you not find a way to explain the meaning of the 'official' names in your text? I would never guess 'fear of the dead' or 'of pain' from 'monstrophobic'. Not all fears are phobias. It would be helpful if you loosed at the Single-word-request tag info and formulated your question as it suggests, including an example sentence and your research. – Spagirl Mar 24 '17 at 9:04
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    People who know what -phobic means would think Monstrophobic was a fear of monsters. – ab2 Mar 24 '17 at 9:20
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    What's wrong with "fear of the dead"? – Hot Licks Mar 24 '17 at 16:57
  • I'm not sure your average reader would have any worse time understanding the 'official phobia' word you may have found over your suggested use of the word 'monstrophobic'. I would either settle for plain and clear English, or go with a technical word. To try and find some word that meets halfway is going to give you the best of neither world. – Gary Mar 24 '17 at 17:01
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I'd use "necrophobic" to mean "scared of the dead". It isn't unimaginable for the average reader to understand "necro" as "dead".

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    It's more likely (I think) that necrophobic would be taken to mean "fear of death" rather than fear of those who have died. The necro- prefix indicates "death" or "corpse". I suppose it all depends on context, and we haven't been given any. – Andrew Leach Mar 24 '17 at 17:14
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If you don't mind a hyphenated word, pain-averse is a good one for your second question (pain-aversion for a noun form).

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