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For example:

"Though he was late for class, he walked slowly down the corridor."
This is considered a complex sentence as "Though he was late for class" is a dependent clause.

However, I can change the placement of "though" without altering the meaning or any other parts of the sentence as such:

"He walked slowly down the corridor though he was late for class."
Here, there are two independent clauses ("He walked slowly down the corridor" and "he was late for class") joined by a conjunction.

Is the second version now a compound sentence, rather than a complex one?

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Here, there are two independent clauses ("He walked slowly down the corridor" and "he was late for class") joined by a conjunction.

Though is not a conjunction. Conjunctions can be remembered by the acronym FANBOYS: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so.

Though is a subordinating conjunction. Therefore, the sentence is complex, not compound.

  • "Though is not a conjunction ... Though is a subordinating conjunction"--isn't there a contradiction here (unless "subordinating" is acting as a non-intersective adjective)? Shouldn't the first sentence be "Though is not a coordinating conjunction"? – herisson Jun 23 at 8:42

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