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Isn't the phrase It’s hard to admit that ... ambiguous?

For instance: It’s hard to admit that the sight of these umbrella-wielding infocrats hurrying by, radiating self-importance, strikes me as some kind of affirmation of the human spirit.

What's the meaning after all? It's hard to admit (to myself) that this is so, or it's hard to admit because this isn't so at all (kind of sarcasm)?

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    "Sharply dressed executives, bankers and databrokers stride past me; people who could easily work from their homes, who could operate entirely within their own skulls — and even, with the help of mods, choose to enjoy it. It's hard to admit that the sight of these umbrella-wielding infocrats hurrying by, radiating self-importance, strikes me as some kind of affirmation of the human spirit. The light suddenly dims, and I look up to see two layers of churning grey cloud racing each other across the sky. Seconds later, I'm drenched." Greg Egan, Quarantine. – We oath to creation Mar 19 '17 at 19:44
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    But other people probably don't. And the context might help them answer your question. – We oath to creation Mar 19 '17 at 19:52
  • I have a problem with starting the sentence with "it." Why not say, "I find hard to admit that the sight of these . . .." – rhetorician Mar 19 '17 at 19:52
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    It's hard to admit is usually a concession that one's former opinion was wrong. – deadrat Mar 19 '17 at 19:58
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    It's hard to admit that your comment does entirely exclude a possibility of sarcastic reading :) – Michael Login Mar 19 '17 at 20:07
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"It's hard to admit..." is not usually used sarcastically - it would be too confusing.

It is simply a self-effacing acknowledgement that one's thoughts or reactions to something are contradictory to what one thought one believed - or, should believe.

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it's entirely context-dependent. in one context, "I love you" is a sincere expression of devotion. In another, it's an expression of deep hatred. ambiguity like this is a permanent feature of human language.

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