2

My context is that a gym provides several different physical exercises that work to strengthen different corresponding parts of the body; for example, the chest, back, arm(s), leg(s), etc.

I want to say that the gym provides exercises specific to different body parts, but I want to say this using an adjective in front of the word "exercises", e.g.,

The gym provides ______ exercises.

and I don't want to use an expression with hyphenated words, such as "body-part-specific" exercises.

So is there any more elegant one word to say the gym provides "body-part-specific" exercises?

  • 5
    You might consider "targeted." This obviously doesn't explicitly state that the exercises are targeting different muscle groups, but, in the context of a gym, I think most readers would understand it to be implied. – MDHunter Mar 17 '17 at 21:25
  • 1
    Yeah, "targeted", or "focused". – Hot Licks Mar 17 '17 at 21:44
  • 1
    You might compare/contrast "targeted" with "full-body" to say, for example "the gym offers targeted and full-body exercises." That should make the meaning clear. – Martin Burch Mar 17 '17 at 22:07
  • The question seems well formed to me. And it has also has a specific answer. bodybuilding.com/fun/drobson176.htm – Phil Sweet Mar 18 '17 at 14:46
  • Isn't that 'topical'? – Robbie Goodwin Mar 28 '17 at 0:13
1

Preserving comments:

You might consider "targeted [exercises]." This obviously doesn't explicitly state that the exercises are targeting different muscle groups, but, in the context of a gym, I think most readers would understand it to be implied. – MDHunter

"targeted", or "focused". – Hot Licks

You might compare/contrast "targeted" with "full-body" to say, for example "the gym offers targeted and full-body exercises." That should make the meaning clear. – Martin Burch

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.