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I scrape ice of the car

Can we use 'from' instead of 'of' if yes, why is 'of' preferred here?

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  • 3
    "of" is just a typo. It should have been "off" instead
    – Amir Uval
    Commented Mar 16, 2017 at 12:40
  • 4
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is based on a typo of of instead of off.
    – Drew
    Commented Mar 16, 2017 at 14:46
  • I dont know how to close a question, you can tell me.
    – Fuad Ak
    Commented Mar 17, 2017 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

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You can scrape the ice from the car, never of the car (the ice doesn't belong to the car). You can however scrape the ice off the car.

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This phrase is not idiomatic. You scrape something off something else; and from works as well but is used less often – see this Google Ngram query.

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  • They are also semantically different. "from" implies that that car has ice inside
    – Amir Uval
    Commented Mar 16, 2017 at 12:43
  • I disagree. "Off" excludes the idea that the ice may be inside the car but "from" doesn't imply that it is, just that it could be.
    – Mike C
    Commented Mar 16, 2017 at 13:49

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