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I wanted to see whether this phrase is grammatically correct or not. I want to use it in my PhD thesis.

"Customers have more freedom to whether buy a new product or to get their money back. "

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  • Customers have more freedom as to whether buy a new product or to get their money back. – JMP Mar 16 '17 at 4:57
  • "Customers have more freedom whether to buy a new product or get their money back". Though 'whether..or' is used to talk about two or more possibilities, it has an implication of doubt sometimes. I prefer "Customers have more freedom either to buy a new product or get their money back". – mahmud k pukayoor Mar 16 '17 at 5:36
  • These options don't make sense to me. Customers always have the freedom to buy a new product; perhaps they are exchanging a defective product for a different one instead of getting their money back? – Xanne Mar 17 '17 at 1:02
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The standard English correlative conjunction is: either...or

"whether " in your sentence is misused.

 ...either buy a new product or get their money back.