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In today's grammar course, we saw an example sentence about emphasizing a whole clause:

It was because they were playing in London that England had an advantage.

Our teacher has asked us to give a similar example, and one student has given the answer:

It was because he was taller than her that gave him an advantage.

Although it didn't follow the exact same pattern, the teacher said it was grammatically correct. I can't verbally explain it but the sentence somehow feels strange to me, is this sentence grammatically correct?

Thanks in advance.

  • Sounds clumsy. Maybe: It was because he was taller that gave him an advantage over her. – Yosef Baskin Mar 15 '17 at 15:13
  • "It was because he was taller than her that gave him an advantage over her". – mahmud koya Mar 15 '17 at 15:22
  • The reason it sounds strange is because we would normally expect the sentence to read: It was because he was taller than her that he gained/had an advantage. But instead of using the pronoun he as the subject, the sentence uses him as the indirect object. – Ronald Sole Mar 15 '17 at 15:26
  • @RonaldSole - I'd opt for: He had an advantage because he was taller than her – but that's a different grammar lesson, I suppose. – J.R. Mar 15 '17 at 15:35
  • Note that because he was taller than her is not a noun phrase, so it can't be used as the subject of the verb gave. To create a credible noun phrase there you'd need something like It was the fact that he was taller than her that gave him an advantage. – FumbleFingers Mar 15 '17 at 16:09

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