0

I need to write the following two sentences in one sentence.

  • A is averaged with the values at level 2,3, and 4.
  • B is integrated/summed with the values at level 2,3, and 4.

Can I write: A and B are averaged and integrated respectively with the values at level 2,3, and 4? Would you please help me how to write such type of sentences?

3
  • 2
    I'd say your two sentences sound much better and are easier to understand than your single. Why do you "need" one single sentence? And if you really do, I'd simply replace the period with a comma and use whereas or another similar word to tie the two statements together. – Allan S. Hansen Mar 15 '17 at 9:20
  • 1
    @Kay That's not compatible with your question's dot points. The first dot point implies that A is a value, and that value is mixed with those at levels 2,3 and 4, and the result is 'averaged'. The dot point doesn't imply that A is the result of the averaging. Similarly with your question's second dot point. – Lawrence Mar 16 '17 at 12:03
  • I have added my comment as a formal answer for your approval. – Yosef Baskin Mar 16 '17 at 14:31
1

Although I agree with Allan's comment, the sentence:

A and B are averaged and integrated respectively with the values at level 2,3, and 4.

is technically accurate. However, when reading papers of a technical/scientific/mathematical nature, the subject matter is already quite tough to follow so as an author you might want to keep the two sentences separate.

1
  • Hello, Sid. Why do you think Allan used a comment here rather than an 'answer'? – Edwin Ashworth Mar 15 '17 at 10:10
1

Here is a compromise edit that does some combining of information for compactness and some separating for clarity:

A and B use the values at level 2, 3, and 4, but A averages the values while B sums them.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.