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In fact, when people have a big picture when working, they tend to make less mistakes compared to the people who pay much energy on details at the very beginning ,because those people's work is not as coherent.

In the sentence above, I use “because” to explain why one group of people make less mistakes, not the reason of paying energy on details of the other group of people, how to differentiate?

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  • There are a half-dozen different problems with the sentence. I'm not quite sure where to begin.
    – Hot Licks
    Mar 14, 2017 at 3:13
  • They make fewer mistakes, not less mistakes. And you should compare to people who expend more energy on details. And your use of the pronoun "those" is confusing.
    – Hot Licks
    Mar 14, 2017 at 3:16
  • I am sorry. I am not very professional in English.
    – zhang yh
    Mar 14, 2017 at 3:16
  • What about the question I asked?
    – zhang yh
    Mar 14, 2017 at 3:18
  • @zhangyh No need to apologize. Learning to write coherent English is difficult. Remember that there's no need to keep any part of a sentence that you don't like. Rephrase. In fact, consider two sentences: People who start a task learning the big picture make fewer mistakes than those who start by spending energy on details. Focusing on minutiae interferes with coherence.
    – deadrat
    Mar 14, 2017 at 3:21

1 Answer 1

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I would put it this way:

People who look at the big picture when working tend to make less mistakes compared to those focused on details. A broad focus makes work more coherent.

If a sentence becomes too complex, always think about splitting it into multiple sentences. Also, try to avoid repeating yourself or including too much information that can be inferred from what you have already said.

For example, "at the very beginning" isn't really necessary to get your point across. Your sentence also uses the word "people" three times, which contributes to the confusion you described.

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