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I remember that I read somewhere a comment about a building that is out of place, does not blend well with the surrounding architecture, and I think the author of that comment used a specific word to describe such building. Any thoughts?

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His Royal Highness the Price of Wales in a 1984 speech to the Royal Institute of British Architects described a proposed extension to the National Gallery in London as

a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a much-loved and elegant friend.

This could be the quote you have in mind.

  • Not exactly the quote, but rather the adjective 'monstrous'. The word is monstrosity, thanks. – John Doe Mar 9 '17 at 18:37
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It's not an architectural term, but sore thumb is often used to describe buildings out of place:

startribune.com: Are contemporary homes cool kids, or sore thumbs?

ilovetheupperwestside.com: UWS Buildings that Stick Out Like Sore Thumbs

http://www.building.co.uk/: Strata tower: Southwark’s sore thumb

Also, intrusive:

http://onlineathens.com/: The placement of the tower is intrusive when you balance the scale and placement of the buildings in the immediate vicinity of the tower. It sticks out like a sore thumb.

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An anachronism is:

something or someone that is not in its correct historical or chronological time, especially a thing or person that belongs to an earlier time

otherwise eyesore:

an ugly object or building

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It is perhaps an incongruous building.

ODO:

incongruous ADJECTIVE

Not in harmony or keeping with the surroundings or other aspects of something.

‘Critics argue the park itself is incongruous in a country where around half the population of 130m lives below the poverty line.’

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