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Usually e.g. is used after a general statement to give an example:

Use some sort of cloth to clean the table (e.g. a dish rag or kitchen towel).

If the general statement is implied from the example, we can remove it completely and include something like (for example):

To clean the table, use a dish rag or kitchen towel (for example).

My Question:

Would it be appropriate to use e.g. here instead?

To clean the table, use a dish rag or kitchen towel (e.g.).

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    Yes, that's pretty common and idiomatic. Anywhere you feel comfortable using the actual words "for example", "e.g." is an appropriate substitute.
    – Dan Bron
    Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 20:06
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    By the time we get to the end of the examples, maybe we already know they are examples. Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 20:18
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    @DanBron I disagree, I've never seen (e.g.) placed at the end of the sentence. Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 20:49
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    @Azor-Ahai You're free to disagree, of course, but not only have I seen it used this way, I've used it this way myself.
    – Dan Bron
    Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 20:50
  • @DanBron Interesting. Perhaps it's specific to a kind of literature? Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 20:51

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I have not seen that done, and in the specific given instance, it's really unnecessary. You haven't given any examples, you given instruction on what to use.

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    Not sure it's unnecessary. Without it it means "use a dish rag or kitchen towel" (only, nothing else). With it it means "use a dish rag or kitchen towel" (but other things are possible).
    – John D
    Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 21:21

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