2

http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/120/the-invisible-man/2071/chapter-2/

"Good-afternoon," said the stranger, regarding him, as Mr. Henfrey says, with a vivid sense of the dark spectacles, "like a lobster."

  • "like a lobster's protruding eyes" – mahmud koya Mar 7 '17 at 13:21
  • The two quotes appear to be continuous, adding to the confusion. It would be clearer if written as the dark spectacles like a lobster. – Yosef Baskin Mar 7 '17 at 17:25
  • @YosefBaskin the spectacles aren't the 'lobsterish' bit - it's the way he's looking at him. The spectacles are just thrown in there for a bit of H.G. Wells randomness – marcellothearcane Mar 12 '17 at 15:32
1

It's in two parts.

"Good afternoon," said the stranger

and:

regarding him, as Mr. Henfrey says, with a vivid sense of the dark spectacles, "like a lobster."

Lobsters have eyes that stick out, and he was regarding him 'like a lobster', which is basically 'very intently'.

The reason its in speech marks is because it is an expression of Mr. Henfrey.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.