1

What would something that shows you like the equivalent of something else in another language be defined as? Or a book that teaches you another language be called?

"The "Rosetta stone" show that apple is manzana in spanish."

  • 1
    The ancient language decoder tablet? – jxh Mar 6 '17 at 18:32
  • Does it have to be a single word? Bilingual or foreign language dictionary (or @Cameron's lexicon with appropriate adjective) is the most common term for something used to look up "apple" in English and get "manzana" in Spanish (or vice versa). For something that teaches another language, you'd use [foreign] language textbook or maybe primer or grammar. And your own Rosetta Stone can be used for something that is used to decode something that was previously unknown (even—or especially—if that wasn't its original purpose). – 1006a Mar 6 '17 at 19:35
  • Secret decoder ring, er, tablet. – Drew Mar 6 '17 at 20:29
  • Typically you refer to the as language1 - language2 dictionaries E.g. My Spanish-English Dictionary says that apple is manzana in Spanish. – Jim Mar 6 '17 at 21:00
2

It would be a translator

  • A person who translates from one language into another, especially as a profession
  • A computer program that translates from one programming language into another

The general process would be called translation

  • The process of translating words or text from one language into another.

A physical book might be known as a translation guide.

0

Lexicon is probably the best word for what you are looking for:

  1. the vocabulary of a particular language, field, social class, person, etc.
  • A lexicon is usually monolingual. – deadrat Mar 6 '17 at 18:28
  • True, but the only other term I can think of would be a translation guide, which is not a single word, although it is the generally accepted term from what I can see online. – Cameron Mar 6 '17 at 18:32
-1

The Rosetta Stone is a language course. The course is not a lexicon, dictionary, or translator. It teaches students a new language online, at their own pace.

Rosetta Stone site ...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.