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I was watching a gaming between two players and the commentator was saying "the Oracle was icing for the rest of the game, now he does not have it solid, he has to buy a new one". I know that icing is the stuff that you put on top of the ice cream/cake... but can anyone share what does that mean in the specific context?

When you say something is "icing" as the metaphor, does it mean it is so important that it is necessary to have? or it is a good add-on and good to have but not really necessary.

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    Can you provide the time code in the video where the quote is spoken? "Icing" could have a specific meaning in that context. Icing the kicker in American Football and Icing the Puck in Ice Hockey are different from something being the icing on the cake.. – jejorda2 Mar 4 '17 at 22:07
  • @jejorda2 updated – B.Mr.W. Mar 4 '17 at 22:17
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    In the context of icing on the cake, it means nice to have but not necessary. – fixer1234 Mar 4 '17 at 22:38
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    @fixer1234 Yes, "the icing on the cake" is the extra bonus, which is additional to the main reward. – WS2 Mar 4 '17 at 23:38
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Listening to the video i believe what is meant is, the oracle is nice to have but unnecessary in order to continue with or successfully play the game. An example sentence could be

Given the time remaining, it is a forgone conclusion that the leader will win the game, any more points would just be icing on the cake.

He is using it like one would use the expression

"the rest is just icing on the cake"

Because Cake is awesome, cake does not need icing to be awesome because it is cake. ( that does not stop us from putting icing on our cake).

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