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(This punishment may or may not be fictional.)

Boy A has a bottle of alcohol in his room which his Dad finds. His Dad then forces him to drink the entire bottle in order to punish him.

What is this punishment known as?

Examples of context:

  1. I find the best way to stop someone doing something like that, is some good, old fashioned, _____.
  2. ... And then Dad forced me to drink the whole bottle! I didn't think people actually _______ in real life!
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  • 4
    Aversion therapy is perhaps related. But the question title is really misleading, it needs to be rephrased.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:24
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    Misanthropic tyranny.
    – Dan
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:27
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    This was a common punishment for kids caught smoking cigarettes back in the day. Being made to smoke a whole pack of cigarettes would make them really sick, theoretically creating an aversion. In practice it was pretty ineffective though.
    – barbecue
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:33
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    New title is much clearer
    – barbecue
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:38
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    If the boy is an actual child and the alcohol is actual liquor (like vodka or rum), an apt word would likely be murder. Mar 3 '17 at 17:38
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Perhaps forced overindulgence works here though it doesn't exactly fit in the second example sentence.

I find the best way to stop someone doing something like that, is some good, old fashioned, forced overindulgence.

ODO:

forced ADJECTIVE

1 Obtained or imposed by coercion or physical power.

‘Some even view it as a form of forced medication and mental and physical control.’

overindulgence NOUN

1 The action or fact of having too much of something enjoyable.

‘In fact, there was so much of it I rode the train home feeling thoroughly sick from overindulgence.’

0

Rub someone's nose in it means to use the 'bad' object in particular to punish the 'bad' house pet or child. In conversation, it means to make things worse by pointing them out or reminding the victim to re-experience the pain.

Fig. to remind one of something one has done wrong; to remind one of something bad or unfortunate that has happened. (Alludes to a method of housebreaking pets.) When Bob failed his exam, his brother rubbed his nose in it. Mary knows she shouldn't have broken off her engagement. Don't rub her nose in it.

Not to be graphic, but the origin is that pet owners misguidedly thought they could train a dog by rubbing its nose in its own business (waste). The idea was that if pets experience the unpleasant result of 'making' in the wrong spot, that will end their misbehavior.

McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

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  • This isn't exactly right, but it's probably as close as you're going to get to a widely recognized idiom.
    – barbecue
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:56
  • I think this metaphor is only used for reminding someone about something.
    – k1eran
    Mar 3 '17 at 18:14
  • Used figuratively, rubbing is reminding you of your mistake. Used literally, rubbing is punishing with your own mistake. Mar 3 '17 at 20:43
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Boy-A has a bottle of alcohol in his room which his Dad finds. His Dad then force-feeds him the entire bottle in order to punish him.

Force-feeding is the practice of feeding a human or other animal against their will. The term "gavage" (pronunciation: /ɡəˈvɑːʒ/) refers to the supplying of a nutritional substance by means of a small plastic feeding tube passed through the nose (nasogastric) or mouth (orogastric) into the stomach. In hospitals, some psychiatric patients can also be restrained so that sedatives can be injected into them; this happens if patients have been non-compliant with their instructions. — Wikipedia

Obviously Boy-A is drinking not eating, but I think the term force-feed will be understood.

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    Force-feeding describes the action, but doesn't convey the punishment aspect. Force-feeding can be done for many reasons other than punishment,such as to prevent prisoners from starving themselves to death during hunger strikes, and to fatten goose livers.
    – barbecue
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:53
  • @barbecue Yes that is a good point, though I think the sentence's context may make clear it's a punishment not medical treatment. I think OP needs to add a sample sentence with a ____ .
    – k1eran
    Mar 3 '17 at 17:58
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    I think a sentence describing the punishment is as good as it's going to get. Sometimes there just isn't a word for something.
    – barbecue
    Mar 3 '17 at 18:01
-1

Nauseation is an uncommon word meaning the process of making someone feel sick.

It could be used in the OPs context:

I find the best way to stop someone doing something like that, is some good, old fashioned, nauseation.

.... And then Dad forced me to drink the whole bottle! I didn't think people actually nauseated in real life!

A similar punishment type involves making someone continue a prohibited act ad nauseam. A prefect might order a classmate to run round and round the field as punishment for running in the corridor, or stand in the playground and constantly repeat the same word over and over again as punishment for bad language.

Looked at from another angle the word encouragement could be used. The idea is that if a person does something he shouldn't he should be encouraged to carry on as it will eventually make him lose interest, so if the father simply "encouraged" rather than forced the boy to drink the rest of the bottle, perhaps sharing it, this would also deter the son from drinking in the future.

I find the best way to stop someone doing something like that, is some good, old fashioned, encouragement.

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