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Like when the teacher is talking and you already know the answer way before she finishes asking the question. You are in a state of ...

I'm trying to think of the word or words that best describe this state of mind. It's a state that I want to create as a teacher where I repeatedly give students more explicit examples of a concept over time, but I wait until the very end to point out the obvious concept that connects all those examples. I want the student to have a sense of anticipation and excitement that they already know what concept I'm referring to before I ever state it explicitly. I'm hoping this teaching exercise will build their confidence in the material. I just don't know the best term to use to describe this state of mind that I'm trying to induce in the student.

I have considered using the words obvious or suspense but I am looking for something a little more specific to the cognitive aspect of the meaning. It's almost something attune to a mental itch that you really, really want to scratch.

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    Perhaps a state of readiness or eagerness? – Trent Bartlem Mar 2 '17 at 3:31
  • I like the word eagerness. That seems to capture it well. – BarrettNashville Mar 2 '17 at 3:34
  • I agree that "eagerness" is the word. That feeling is based on your students' recognition or identification of a concept that is already known. – Gustavson Mar 2 '17 at 3:59
  • The OP says "Like when the teacher is talking and you already know the answer way before she finishes asking the question. You are in a state of.." I don't get how can this be eagerness? Eagerness is close to keenness or enthusiasm. I think anticipation or expectation as answered by @Chris are better suited to the context presented by the OP. I get the OP wants to create eagerness among the pupils, by this method, but I don't think the term is eagerness. – Rio1210 Apr 1 '17 at 7:50
  • Before you state it explicitly (as per your words), could you not call that implicit understanding? – Flater May 31 '17 at 10:05
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Anticipation Expectation Receptivity Frustration Hunger ?

In psychology terms, I think you are describing Jakk Panksepp's SEEKING, but that term doesn't work well except as jargon.

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You are in a Responsive state.

quick to respond or react appropriately or sympathetically

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  • Does this not describe the nature of the student; rather than imply they already know the answer before the question is asked in this particular case? – Flater May 31 '17 at 11:43
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Anticipatory is the state of anticipating your opportunity. The joy of this frequently disappears once the opportunity is acquired and the true conditions are understood.

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    Elliot, this answer would be better with a citation. – Davo Aug 29 '17 at 19:11
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Alacrity describes this state of mind well.

When happily ready to give the answer...

"You are in a state of alacrity."

alacrity, noun: ...cheerful readiness or willingness. (OED)

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Not single words, but colloquially, you might be "drooling with anticipation" or "chomping at the bit"

The first might be how you feeling waiting for a great meal; the second is how a race horse might feel waiting at the gate.

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Like when the teacher is talking and you already know the answer way before she finishes asking the question. You are in a state of ...

...preparation.

noun : 2. a state of being prepared

adj : subjected to a special process or treatment

  • They were well prepared and scored high on the test.

prepared Synonyms: fit, ready, set

Definition of prepared for English Language Learners:

  • made ready in advance

  • ready for something

  • in a suitable condition for some purpose or activity

  • willing to do something

Slang for preparation: prep.

Painting a room involves a lot of prep.

  • Like when the teacher is talking and you already know the answer way before she finishes asking the question. You are in a state of preparation. You are prepared, prepped.

Merriam Webster

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