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let me ask a question of an usage of schwa as a phoneme and [r].

Schwa can be regarded as an independent phoneme, apart from weak forms of other vowels, I heard. And here, I treat this idea as true.

Then my question is: Is this schwa phoneme can be followed by consonant [r] in the same syllable?

If so, I think that this schwa phoneme can take two forms, one just the ordinary schwa or little bit rhotic schwa, the other completely rhotic schwa, that is rhotacized schwa, because other vowels can take these two forms when being followed by consonant [r] in the same syllable.

Please think about it.

  • Would this be like the "o" in "work", or the endings in "doctor", "farmer", etc ? – Oosaka Mar 1 '17 at 12:19
  • "o" in "work" is tensed sound, and the endings are not tensed without stress. They are rhotic schwas. – Motoki Mar 1 '17 at 13:29
  • Why do you say "other vowels can take these two forms when being followed by consonant [r] in the same syllable"? Can you give an example? I think my vowels are always rhotacized when followed by /r/ in the same syllable. – sumelic Mar 1 '17 at 13:39
  • You might try asking this over on Liguistics StackExchange. (I don't this question can be migrated there, though, since they're still in beta.) Just remember that /r/ is not the same as /ɹ/ over there; the English one is the latter. – Michael Seifert Mar 1 '17 at 15:45
  • Thank you, Michael Seifert. I didn't know that site. I'll try. – Motoki Mar 2 '17 at 4:19

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