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What do you call a person who behaves in an overly familiar way, taking too many liberties, saying things that only someone with a closer relationship with you would normally say?

closed as off-topic by Mazura, jimm101, Hank, MetaEd Feb 28 '17 at 19:03

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on choosing an ideal word or phrase must include information on how it will be used in order to be answered. For help writing a good word or phrase request, see: About single word requests" – Mazura, jimm101, Hank, MetaEd
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • There's "glad-hander" -- one who, like a politician, greets everyone with a (possibly figurative) handshake and a smile, but is not especially sincere in doing so. – Hot Licks Feb 27 '17 at 22:48
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    I call 'em creepy! – rhetorician Feb 28 '17 at 3:39
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    Perhaps clingy? – mbomb007 Feb 28 '17 at 17:20
  • Also, I would say that this is sometimes the case for people with autism. What I imply is that don't put real people under whatever term you find for that since the reasons of such behavior might be well different. – noncom Feb 28 '17 at 17:34
14

oMiKey is close, but I believe this question requires a term with a slightly more specific implication. I would say this person is 'forward', from Webster:

Lacking modesty or reserve.  Brash, poorly disciplined children are often distressingly forward.

11

They are being over-familiar - Too familiar. Inappropriately or unduly intimate or informal (OED).

OR,

Impertinent - (Of persons, their actions, etc.) Meddling with what is beyond one's province; intrusive, presumptuous; behaving without proper respect or deference to superiors or strangers; insolent or saucy in speech or behaviour (OED).

OR (just plain),

Rude - Unmannerly, uncivil, impolite; offensively or deliberately discourteous.(OED)

  • Have a plus one for Over-familiar. Impertinent is interesting, the definition seems at first glance to meet the terms of the question, but the behaviour seems to come from a place of mischief or mere disrespect without the outwardly deceptive nature of the behaviour described in the question. What i took from the Question was behaviour which would lead a third party to think the relationship was other than it was, which is the bit that makes it creepy. – Spagirl Feb 28 '17 at 16:33
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    @Spagirl - More context would be helpful. 'Impertinent' works for me in the context of someone you don't know asking questions whose answers are none of their business. 'Rude' is a simpler alternative! – Dan Mar 2 '17 at 14:30
  • Hmmm, I was going to disagree on the basis that the original proposition hadn't been someone asking questions whose answer was none of their business, but was about 'behav[ing] in an overly familiar way, taking too many liberties, saying things that only someone with a closer relationship with you would normally say'. But i see TFD thefreedictionary.com/Taking+Liberties has 'behave impertinently' as a meaning of 'take liberties', so perhaps my view was coloured by Rhetorician's comment about creepiness. – Spagirl Mar 2 '17 at 14:47
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The word you want is presumptuous: (link and defintion from Merriam-Webster)

overstepping due bounds (as of propriety or courtesy) : taking liberties

The word shares a root with presume, suggesting a person who presumes to know things better or to speak to people as they though were more familiar. As an example:

It was very presumptuous of Bob to ask Alice about the details of her vacation plans.

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    To me, presumptuous simply implies the person is quick to assume things. This seems a bit off topic to be honest. ` – omikes Feb 27 '17 at 22:15
  • @oMiKeY Are you basing that on the fact that the word has "assume" as it's base? Also, can you post a link to that definition of presumptuous? I cannot find one but would be interested to see one. – Hank Feb 27 '17 at 22:24
  • The word presumptuous has the word "presume" at its base, not assume. But yes, it is the same idea. For a more descriptive explanation of both words, please see this link: englishplus.com/grammar/00000304.htm – omikes Feb 28 '17 at 6:15
5

Forward

confident and honest in a way that ignores the usual social rules and might seem rude (Cambridge Dictionary adjective)

and

too bold or free in manners; pushing; presumptuous (Your Dictionary #5)

  • better definitions than the current top answer! – Andy Feb 28 '17 at 15:04
1

Presumptuous - (of a person or their behavior) failing to observe the limits of what is permitted or appropriate. "I hope I won't be considered presumptuous if I offer some advice"

0

pert - boldly forward in speech or behavior; impertinent;

impertinent - intrusive or presumptuous,; brash, inappropriate

  • Please cite your sources. – Glorfindel Feb 28 '17 at 11:03
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    We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed. – Skooba Feb 28 '17 at 12:42
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Depending on the context, smitten or love-struck could fit.

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    We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed. – Skooba Feb 28 '17 at 16:30
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I would say the person is 'nonchalant'.

(of a person or manner) feeling or appearing casually calm and relaxed; not displaying anxiety, interest, or enthusiasm.

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    I'm gonna have to say this one is way off also. Someone who is acting this way may be acting nonchalant, but someone who is acting nonchalant is very rarely acting the way the OP describes. – Hank Feb 27 '17 at 21:51
  • My interpretation of the adjective in question is that the person is overly casual. In what situation is a nonchalant person not acting overly casual? Out of curiosity, is English your first language (not to be offensive)? – omikes Feb 27 '17 at 22:19
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    My point is that nonchalant is not something that properly encases the description in the OP. It's like suggesting the word friendly because the person in question is also acting friendly. While the person described may be acting nonchalant, the word in no way implies they are overstepping or taking too many liberties. And yes, it is my first language. – Hank Feb 27 '17 at 22:22
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    "... the word in no way implies they are overstepping or taking too many liberties" Agree to disagree, although it seems you are a bit vague in your disagreement, saying that its "not something that properly encases the description" but providing no examples or reasoning. That aside, the number one answer (as of this post) is presumptuous, which encompasses a much broader group of personalities. A snob may be presumptuous, but also reserved, thus unfitting of an answer to this question. I do wonder why you did not downvote and post a negative comment on that answer. Politics do escape me. – omikes Feb 27 '17 at 22:36
  • It's not on my shoulders to prove your answer wrong and it's just my opinion. You can stand by your answer all you want, and I did not downvote your post. I did upvote presumptuous because it does fit all aspects of the OPs description. – Hank Feb 27 '17 at 22:39

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