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Can you put the following sentence

She raised him along with his siblings.

in a way that the word together has the same meaning as the word along in the sentence above?

If you would say

She raised him together with his siblings.

it would mean that his siblings helped raising him.

Is that right or am I mistaken here?

Could you use together and still convey the same meaning as the first sentence? For example:

She raised them all together.

  • I see nothing wrong with the final sentence. – Hank Feb 27 '17 at 19:49
  • Not sure if you want to say mom and kids raised him, or mom raised him in the family with the other kids. None of your examples mean that his siblings helped raising him. – Yosef Baskin Feb 27 '17 at 20:05
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In your first example,

She raised him along with his siblings.

along is part of a multi-word preposition: along with. If you take out along, it will still make sense, but it will just sound different.

She raised him with his siblings.

In your second example,

She raised him together with his siblings.

This means that not only did she raise him, she also raised his siblings. They are relatively the same thing. Again, together is in a two-word preposition: together with. It cannot mean that she had help from his siblings raising him, since you said together with.

Your third sentence:

She raised them all together.

Together is now a single-word adverb. If you take out all, the sentence will become

She raised them together.

where together is the adverb.

Hope this helps!

  • Thanks for your answer! I still have one question: why can't the second sentence using 'together with' not mean that his siblings helped raising him? If you put 'together with' in the beginning of the sentence, e.g. “Together with his siblings, she raised him.“ it would mean exactly that (that his siblings helped raising him), wouldn't it? Is this a matter of where in the sentence the 'together with' is? – Harmless Psycho Feb 28 '17 at 5:20
  • @HarmlessPsycho No, see this website. dictionary.com/browse/together-with – Emereal Feb 28 '17 at 6:30
  • And how would you say it if the meaning is supposed to be 'his siblings helped raising him'? If I would want to express that I still would use together: “They (the mother and his siblings) raised him together.“ – Harmless Psycho Feb 28 '17 at 16:05
  • Ok, I see the problem now. In this example the word together simply refers to the mother and the siblings only, not to him. That's probably what confused me. – Harmless Psycho Feb 28 '17 at 16:09
  • @HarmlessPsycho To answer your question, a sentence to mean 'his siblings helped raising him' could be 'With the help of his siblings, she raised him.' – Emereal Feb 28 '17 at 18:52

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