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When phrasing a sentence that goes like this:

Max gambled all his money away and lost it, <apart of course/of course apart> from his pending multi-million dollar inheritance.

Do you say apart of course or of course apart?

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    “of course” is two words. – Jim Feb 26 '17 at 20:49
  • Yeah, what motivates you to remove the space from between "of" and "course"? – Dan Bron Feb 26 '17 at 20:50
  • Apologies, ignore that, it's a mistake on my part. – Moataz Elmasry Feb 26 '17 at 20:51
  • @DanBron any particular reason why you edited the erroneous spaces back into my question? Also, removing the placeholder for where I want the phrase to be added in the sentence will confuse the reader of the question – Moataz Elmasry Feb 26 '17 at 21:11
  • I didn't intend to put the spaces back in, nor remove the placeholder. I just wanted to change your preformatted (code) text to quotes, using blockquote and italics respectively. I must have messed up editing somehow. Let me see if I can fix it. Please hold. – Dan Bron Feb 26 '17 at 21:13
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It depends upon whether 'of course' is intended to relate to his loss of money or to his pending inheritance.

Max gambled all his money away and lost it, of course, apart from his pending ... inheritance. In this statement 'of course' could relate either to his loss or to his inheritance.

Max gambled all his money away and lost it, apart from, of course, his pending ... inheritance. In this statement 'of course' only relates to his inheritance.

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