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  1. When I was a child, I walked to school everyday instead going by cycle.

Is this sentence correct? The following sentence seems better to me:

  1. When I was a child, I walked to school everyday instead of going by cycle.

Are my intuitions right?

  • 1
    #1 contradicts itself, saying that you walked but that you cycled. – Hot Licks Feb 23 '17 at 12:46
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'Instead of' is a preposition. We use it to show one person, thing or action replaces another.

E.g: When I was a child, I walked to school every day instead of going by a cycle.

She often goes swimming instead of going to school.

Instead (alone without of) is an adverb. It often comes at the beginning or end of a clause.

E.g: When I was a child, I did not use a cycle; instead I walked every day.

(From Michael Swan's PEU)

-2

"When I was a child, I walked to school everyday instead of going by bicycle."

  • 2
    Except that the first is oxymoronic. – Hot Licks Feb 23 '17 at 12:42
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    The first sentence doesn't make sense, indeed. Something like When I was a childe, I never walked to school, instead going by bicycle would make more sense. It would mean the opposite of the second sentence. – oerkelens Feb 23 '17 at 12:44
  • Ha. I just realised I misread it. Thanks for the heads-up. – Marinus Feb 23 '17 at 12:45
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    All you have at the moment is simply a restatement of sentence 2. You need to explain why that's correct. – Andrew Leach Feb 23 '17 at 14:06

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