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It seems that I often write something like this:

The sizes of these datasets seem to grow faster than the processing power of computers does.

Now, a longish text I'd written was proofread (by a non-professional) and in every case the suggested correction was as follows:

The sizes of these datasets seem to grow faster than the processing power of computers.

(Yes – only the last word was deleted by the proofreader.)

Being a non-native user, I'd like to ask if the way of writing that I've adopted from who-knows-where is always wrong. (Personally, I feel that in some cases – too long sentences maybe – it clarifies my intention slightly.)

  • 2
    Actually, it does add something, namely avoiding putting a singular noun (power) with a plural verb (seem). A minor poin, but personally I would always put in does after than, – TimLymington Dec 28 '11 at 13:54
  • @TimLymington 5+ years later, I can tell you that nowadays I do put does after than, pretty consistently I think. I guess I learned it from you, from right here. I also like the first part of your comment a lot. – Pukku Sep 12 '17 at 19:26
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It's not wrong. It's just a stylistic thing, in that "does" doesn't add anything to the sentence, so it might as well be removed.

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