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One can use the phrase "in this sense" to connect a previously made point to the next one.

The designer identity, examined either at a group level or at an individual level, did not reflect a single coherent frame....In this sense, the designer identity was multiplex.

Say I want to list multiple points and then summarize them into a connecting point. I'm trying to think of a good way to say:

A, B, and C. In these senses, ...

Some ideas:

  • "given these circumstances..."
  • "in these ways..."
  • "based on this..."

Any other ideas?

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    Before you refer to the sense of your previous statement, shouldn't it make some sense to begin with?
    – deadrat
    Feb 20, 2017 at 18:02
  • I think if those references are only relevant to your main point in a specific restricted sense that's somehow "different" for each referent, either they're not very good examples, or the point you're trying to make is so obscure you probably need an entire paragraph explaining why you've chosen such a disparate mish-mash of supporting references. Feb 20, 2017 at 18:07
  • *In these ways, ...." Feb 21, 2017 at 4:40

2 Answers 2

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I would simply connect with "so"

The designer identity, examined either at a group level or at an individual level, did not reflect a single coherent frame X, Y ,or Z, so, the designer identity was multiplex.

The simplest way is usually best when all that is needed are the facts. If X Y or Z are complex, make two sentences:

The designer identity, examined either at a group level or at an individual level, did not reflect a single coherent frame X...y... or Z....So, the designer identity was multiplex.

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Your example doesn't really fit your question.

A, B, and C. In these senses, ...

You seem to parse your example as if it lists three separate things. But it does not:

The designer identity, examined either at a group level or at an individual level, did not reflect a single coherent frame,... In this sense, the designer identity was multiplex.

This is not a list of three things. It is a single statement:

The designer identity did not reflect a single coherent frame.

It also adds a subclause, which is nothing more than an interjected footnote:

[The designer identity was] examined either at a group level or at an individual level.


You shouldn't be trying to use the plural of "senses", because there is only one mentioned sense: The fact that the designer identity did not reflect a single coherent frame.

This becomes more clear if you substitute it:

The designer identity, examined either at a group level or at an individual level, did not reflect a single coherent frame. Since it did not reflect a single coherent frame, the designer identity was therefore multiplex.

I'm not suggesting that you should use this instead. "In this sense" is perfectly valid to use (and preferred, in my opinion). The above is merely an elaborate example that shows you what "in this sense" is referring to.

Minor note: You also don't need the ellipsis ("..."), since this is not a list of three objects like you initially thought.

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