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In this movie clip, there's this conversation between Monkey and Beetle, starting at 50 seconds into the clip:

Monkey: What?

Beetle: Well, fast learner. Did you know you could do that?

Monkey: Show off.

The context is that while Monkey and Beetle were arguing, Kubo made a boat.

What did Monkey mean by "Show off"?

If interpreted as an imperative mood, it doesn't really make sense to me.

If it's not, what is it?

closed as off-topic by tchrist Feb 18 '17 at 2:26

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  • He is calling the other a "show-off", in other words, making a deliberate and pretentious display of talent. – Cascabel Feb 17 '17 at 20:42
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    @Cascabel Thank you. Then, should it be in one word "show-off"? Also, is it a short form of "You're a show-off"? – listennever Feb 17 '17 at 20:45
  • It's being used as an adjective or noun (take your pick). It's not a verb. – Hot Licks Feb 17 '17 at 20:59
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show-off - a person who tries to impress other people with his or her abilities or possessions [Merriam-Webster]

Typical usage here is for humor. It invites the audience to interpret Monkey has saying, "yes, you made a boat, and it's very good and I'm jealous that you could do it so fast and you know it, so I'm just going to call you a name".

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Think of it like this:

Monkey: What?

Beetle: Well, fast learner. Did you know you could do that?

Monkey: (You/they are a) show off.

  • If it's "they are a show-off", who's "they" here? – listennever Feb 17 '17 at 21:41
  • @listennever The person who did something that requires extreme talent. – Barmar Feb 17 '17 at 21:42

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