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While reading a book, I encountered a sentence that I cannot grammatically understand.

Terrorism is often 'available' in the sense that risk analysts' use the term, in large part because of media coverage.

I would like to know about the usage of the apostrophe, and the meaning of the phrase "in the sense that risk analysts' use the term". Is the phrase "analysts' use the term" grammatically correct?

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    The apostrophe is incorrect. It's a typo, as apostrophe's often are. Best solution: avoid using apostrophes. This is easy in speech. – John Lawler Feb 17 '17 at 16:05
  • I agree that the apostrophe is incorrect, but still have no idea what "Terrorism is often 'available'" means. – Michael J. Feb 17 '17 at 17:50
  • Please provide a link where we can see this text, if you can. – aparente001 Feb 18 '17 at 5:12
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This seems ungrammatical. I think the apostrophe on analysts' is a typo, and I would further rephrase the sentence:

Terrorism is often 'available', in the sense that risk analysts use the term,...

as such:

Terrorism is often 'available', in the sense in which risk analysts use the term...

because the idiom is to use a term in a particular sense. Consider this quotation from C. S. Lewis:

Faith, in the sense in which I am here using the word, is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted, in spite of your changing moods.

The author is trying to say that risk analysts use the word available with a special meaning, and that this special meaning applies to terrorism.

Better yet, and more concise:

Terrorism is often 'available' (in risk analysts' sense) in large part because of media coverage.

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