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Could anybody give me a hand with the morpho-syntactic parsing of the following lines from Shakespeare?

From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty’s rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:

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    The first and fourth lines have main clauses, and the second and third subordinate clauses. The inflected verbs in each line are desire, might, should, and might. No derivational morphology to speak of. Subjects are we, beauty's rose, the riper, and his tender heir, respectively . – user31341 Feb 15 '17 at 0:27
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My contemporary interpretation:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

We hope for more beautiful things

So in that way the height of beauty remains alive forever.

Although he who matures must eventually die,

His own child would perhaps share a similar beauty.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

From fairest creatures we desire increase

--We hope (desire) for more (increase) beautiful things (from fairest creatures)

That thereby beauty’s rose might never die

--So in that way (thereby) the height of beauty (the rose) remains alive forever (might never die)

But as the riper should by time decease

--Although he who matures (the riper) must eventually die (should by time decease),

His tender heir might bear his memory.

--His own child (tender heir) would perhaps (might) share of similar beauty (bear his memory).

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