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I am writing a story with a wealthy woman. I attempting to describe the fancy double gate blocking her driveway, which has a metal symbol (of a swan) that stretches across both gate-doors. Should I just describe it in detail, or is there a way to say that it is ("draped" perhaps?) across the gate?

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The swan Straddles the gate if its left and right half sit on each side of the gate.

Definition of Straddle -

1a. To stand or sit with a leg on each side of; bestride: straddle a horse.

1b. To be on both sides of; extend over or across: a car straddling the centerline.

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I am not aware of a single word to describe what you are referring to, so describing in detail will probably be your best course of action. I would not, however, use the word 'draped,' as this implies the symbol is hanging over the top of the gate, rather than wrought into the gate itself. I personally would describe it as a crest emblazoned across the front of the gate, straddling the divide between the two sides. Or perhaps, rather than 'emblazoned across,' you might say it is wrought into the metal of the gate.

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  • This is writing advice. I'm thinking about close-voting. Feb 10 '17 at 20:00
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    While my answer may cross the line into writing advice, the question itself is asking for a word to describe a symbol across the front of a gate, which is on-topic. I would urge you not to close-vote.
    – Cameron
    Feb 10 '17 at 20:19
  • I meant flagging your 'answer' as a non-answer ('I am not aware of a single word', which is then used to license 'describing in detail' ie writing advice. But I think 'emblazoned across' is a reasonable work-around. Feb 11 '17 at 10:07
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You may refer to such gate as a dyptich.

A pair of pictures on two panels, usually hinged together, even if hinges are generally in the middle.

Gate Diptych by Martin Wong

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