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I am writing a mathematical paper. There is a certain sequence (3) in the paper. I write:

Lemma 4.5. The sequence (3) is exact.

Is that correct, or should I better write with the zero article, like this?

Lemma 4.5. Sequence (3) is exact.

EDIT: I write a formula of a special kind, that we call "a sequence of groups and homomorphisms". This formula has a number, in my case it has number 3. After I write this formula, I claim that it has a certain property: it is "exact". The question is: should write with the definite article "The sequence (3)" or with the zero article "Sequence (3)"?

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, Cascabel, curiousdannii, Hank, Scott Feb 14 '17 at 2:23

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    What is the phrase trying to convey? – Hank Feb 10 '17 at 18:31
  • I write a formula of a special kind, that we call "a sequence of groups and homomorphisms". This formula has a number, in my case it has number 3. I claim that this formula has a certain property: it is "exact". The question is: should write with the definite article "The sequence (3)" or with the zero article "Sequence (3)"? – Mikhail Borovoi Feb 10 '17 at 18:45
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    Please add that comment to the OP. That said, if "Sequence (3)" is the name of the sequence, in a proper sense, I would recommend using the zero article. If you just want to say "the third sequence is exact", then go with "the". – Hank Feb 10 '17 at 18:48
  • @Hank: Thank you! Yes, "Sequence (3)" is like a name. I will use the zero article. – Mikhail Borovoi Feb 10 '17 at 18:54
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You can also write, "the sequence in (3) is exact." If it's an equation, I'll usually write "Equation (3) is...," but I'll also write "the expression in (3) is..." I don't think it really matters, as this is an exotic use of English.

  • What's "exotic" about this? Sequence (3) is the name of formula and the sequence (3) consists of a noun and a restrictive appositive. – deadrat Feb 10 '17 at 20:27

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